Mind Your Energy!

London Skyline

Hello Friends!

As you might have guessed, the photo above was taken from a skyscraper in central London (we have mixed feelings about skyscrapers in London but they do make for some beautiful views). What struck me on that particular day was the contrast of the stillness, the peace, the lightness of the sky in that high up glass space with what I knew was layered underneath it: all kinds of energy moving in every direction, buzzing throughout the city from every floor of the buildings to the street, to the trains rumbling through the underground. It was a moment of accepting the power of stillness simultaneously existing with the power of dynamic energy.

That feeling is the inspiration for this week’s audio guide. It’s a brief guided meditation designed to connect you with the energetic voice, a moment of calm before you step into a more energetic situation, or when you’d simply like to have the moment of calm.

Let us know what you think!

Take Good Care,

Lindsay & Christine

Voice Work for Focus and Concentration

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Hey friends,

Meet Dotty, short for Dorothy Boots. Christine is fostering Dotty for the month while she’s in between homes, and, wow, do cats teach you a lot about voice work! Partly because Dotty is a very vocal kitty, but also because cats provide such great examples of what it is to be fully relaxed or fully engaged–  fully present. We love this picture because it shows such an open, curious sense of focus.

That is what this week’s audio guide is all about: using voice work to help you find a sense of focus and concentration. A little-known side affect of the body work that comes along with working on the voice is that it’s great to help you tune in and gain a sense of focus and concentration. This sequence is useful if you are embarking on a new project, a new school year, a new job, or looking to renew your sense of focus towards your existing ventures. It gets your body releasing and breathing, builds your proprioception (your body’s sense of itself) and in so doing, helps quiet the mind.

We would love to hear from you! How was this sequence helpful to you? What would you like to see more of? Feel free to comment below and let’s start a dialogue. Make your voice heard! Please also share with any family/friends you think might find this useful.

Take good care,

Christine & Lindsay

 

 

Vocal Energy: Stretch!

BeSpoke Stretch

Hello Friends!

In keeping with our back to school/Autumn kickoff vibe here is another quick sequence designed to activate your body so it’s prepared to support a full and energetic voice. We’ll be tackling the idea of vocal energy from a few angles over the next few months, and this will start by encouraging you to consider the effect of your physical behavior.

As always we’re keen to hear how it goes and whether you have any feedback. It’s so easy to sign up to receive emails when we post something new, so get on it!

Take Good Care,

Lindsay & Christine

Keeping it Fresh: setting goals & evolving your practice

 

Hello Friends!

If you’ve followed our posts for awhile you know we love considering all things cyclical and seasonal at BeSpoke Communication. So as summer draws to a close we are taking a few more opportunities to rest, travel, and spend time with family but we are also thinking about what’s next. Key to maintaining a communication skills and presence practice is assessing where you are and what you want focus on moving forward. The foundation of core components like supportive posture, breathwork, mindfulness, and articulation exercises will always be there but depending on where we find ourselves, our attention and approaches will shift and vary. So from time to time it’s worth thinking about what you need from your practice overall and how it can support your goals.

We’re taking some time to focus on this too. As our last post mentioned, we’ll have a little end of summer hiatus where we’ll be creating some new content together and ramping up our plans. It would be great to know what you would find beneficial, what you think about when it comes to communication skills, and how you like to work.

Don’t be shy! We’d love to hear from you.

To get the ball rolling, here are some prompts to get you thinking, writing, drawing about how you’re feeling, what areas are going well, where you’d like to place more attention, and what impact you want your communication skills to have on your life. We’re not trying to give anyone an existential crisis so this could be as simple as being confident in your next performance review or taking on a monologue in a new accent. Or it might be something bigger. It’s all about where you are and what you need.

  • What is going well in your practice right now?
    • Think of something physical that’s feeling good
    • Think about an aspect of your mindset that’s positive
    • Think of one of your favorite personal speaking habits
  • Where are you feeling challenged?
    • Are there physical obstacles for how you want to communicate?
    • Think of where you can cultivate some positivity in your mind
    • Is there a communication habit you would like to shift?
  • What are the goals you’re working towards right now? What would you like to be working towards?
    • Think of a few short term goals, perhaps consider these categories:
      • Personal
      • Professional
      • Family/relationships
    • Think of a few long term goals, again considering these categories:
      • Personal
      • Professional
      • Family/relationships
    • Using whatever arises think about how your communication skills can support these goals and areas of your life:
      • What skills will help you physically?
      • What will help mentally?
      • What habits do you hope to develop in your communications?

Hopefully this gives you some food for thought! Let us know how you get on and we’ll look forward to evolving together this autumn!

Take Good Care,

Lindsay & Christine

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tips for Accessing Accents

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picture from http://www.polyglotclub.com 

Many of our clients come to us either because they are actors who need to learn a new accent for an upcoming project or because they are business-people for whom English is a second language and they would like to work on clarifying their accents. For many, clarifying or learning a new accent can feel overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be! Here are some steps to consider when you are working on an accent:

  1. An accent is a physical behavior. Everyone has an accent, and that accent is based on how your speech muscles (lips, tongue, lower jaw, soft palate) move to shape your speech. For example, a Dublin accent has more spread lips than a Received Pronunciation accent. Learning what the key physical behaviors of the speech muscles are for the accent you are trying to acquire is an empowering way to help keep you consistent— especially if you feel like you don’t have a very good “ear.” To help you figure out the physical behaviors, watch videos of people who have that accent and watch the way their lips/jaw move. See if you can hear the “hesitation sound”—the sound they make when they are thinking, like “um”, and see if you can mimic that and notice how that changes your speech muscles— this tells you what their neutral setting is for the speech muscles in that accent. If you start from that place with your own speech muscles, you are more likely to stay consistent.
  2. Find a good sample. Whether you are learning a new accent or trying to clarify your own, find a sample of someone speaking that has the accent you want to sound like. If possible, find a sample that’s audio-visual, so that you can watch as well as listen in order to discover the speech muscle behaviors mentioned above. If you can find a live person to record, even better! Youtube is a great resource for this. IDEA (the International Dialects of English Archive) is an excellent online resource, although their materials are all audio only, I believe. Even so, they have samples from almost every accent of English.
  3. Find a good accent coach. Work with a coach that will give you tools to make you autonomous, that will help you feel your way into the new accent so that you can keep it consistent, rather than needing to rely on your (or someone else’s) ear. A good accent coach can give you tools that you can apply to learning any accent, so it’s a good investment of your resources, particularly if you will be learning new accents frequently. (we can’t help but plug ourselves here— we do accent coaching at BeSpoke!)

Have other ideas or resources you want to share about accents? Please leave them in the comments below!

Take good care,

Christine and Lindsay

Articulation Work for Camera

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Yet another Anchorman classic

Hey Friends,

I couldn’t help myself and had to use another Anchorman reference for our second sequence for camera work. This is the sequel to our post from a couple of weeks ago about Voice for Camera.  The first sequence focused on your vocal power, and this one focuses more on your speech clarity. Both are important to being understood. This is a great sequence if you work on camera or you are using microphones at live “performance” events (whether that be acting or giving presentations).

Let us know how it goes!

Take good care,

Christine & Lindsay

 

Be a Springtime Blossom! Tips for Spring Allergies and Vocal Care

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Hello Friends!

First of all, Happy Spring! We are very happy to see flowers blooming, the days growing longer, and even getting that little bit warmer in London, although like all early spring days things are certainly changeable. For some (including me), this changeability can cause imbalances in the sinuses and, trying to be as tasteful as possible, hefty production of mucus, which can leave my throat itchy and uncomfortable with post-nasal drip and bring an unhealthy rasp to my voice. It’s not fun and can impact range, breath support, and resonance. But no one should miss out on the fun of spring and of course there are always ways to support ourselves through pungent, pollinated times.

To that end, we thought it would be helpful to share some strategies for coping with the allergy and sinus challenges spring can pose. Because we are not ENTs or allergists these are not medical suggestions but natural means for relief that we have found effective. Please ensure you seek the advice of a doctor for your allergies, especially if you’re being severely affected. We just hope these thoughts will encourage some mindful self-care.

1. Starting with the obvious and eternal advice: HYDRATE

We regularly mention hydration on this blog so I’ll stick to the spring-relevant points here. When temperatures are going up and we’re feeling warmer and perhaps sweating a bit more, drinking hydrating fluids is very important for overall health. In the case of assisting allergies and sinuses, maintaining a good level of hydration can dilute mucus thickness and combat the drying effect that allergy medications like antihistamines and decongestants have on the throat. Just remember drinking water does not instantly hydrate your throat, vital organs reap the benefits first. By some measures it takes at least 20 minutes for your throat and vocal folds to feel any benefit of drinking water while some sticklers say overall hydration is only achieved after 4 hours. Don’t drive yourself crazy with these timelines, just drink throughout the day. A glass of water first thing in the morning and before bed will help too. Spring is a great time of year to make some trendy water infusions so pile in the mint, strawberry, and cucumber!

2. Take a sinus rinse…NETI POT

We could probably write an entire manifesto on Neti pots. Using them has been a game-changer in terms of caring for our voices while living in a big city and suffering from sensitive sinuses. Because they only use salt packets and water we’ve found them to be a great alternative to nasal sprays. Neti pots and salt packets can be found in the allergy treatment sections of drugstores or on Amazon. A written explanation of how to use them is difficult but luckily the amazing Adriene Mishler of Yoga With Adriene has a video on the subject. Check it out and see what you think. For our part, we’ve looked back.

3. Soothing Smells…AROMATHERAPY

This is a simple suggestion, but sometimes experiencing lots of congestion during warmer weather can feel very oppressive. A little essential oil action can go a long way. My preferred oils for this scenario are peppermint and eucalyptus. Just putting a few drops on a tissue, holding it to my nose and gently breathing in goes a long way. I also like to place a few drops on my pillow before bed. Whether it’s essential oils or a lavender infused eye pillow, soothing smell and sensory stimulation can be an easy way to alleviate pressure and provide yourself with some lovely smells!

4. Maintain useful habits…BREATHE AND MOVE

When we don’t feel well it’s tempting to feel like moving should be put on the back burner. Despite this, stretching and tying movement to breath offers the chance to find gentle relief through working muscles and moving the breath, which will gently work on the throat and sinuses. Turning to Adriene again, this is a sequence I like to do when I’m feeling particularly bad (it’s really great for a bad cold as well as allergies).

5. Fresh air, plenty of sleep, good food…SELF CARE

When your allergies are making you all kinds of sniffly don’t shut the windows and stay in a stuffy room, let some air in and get outside. It will help you acclimate to the changes in pollen levels and avoid the dust you find indoors. Pair this with getting enough sleep and eating plenty of good vitamin-packed foods. Dust off that nutri bullet, personal blender, giant blender and make some smoothies! In short, find ways to give yourself extra healthy support.

Please let us know what you find most helpful and we would love to hear your favorite strategies!

Take Care and Be Well,

Lindsay and Christine

Support Work for Camera

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Ron Burgundy from “Anchorman” 

Hey Friends,

Lindsay and I are both big fans of Ron Burgundy– especially the way he warms up before getting on camera! Who doesn’t love a little “How now brown cow?” This week’s audio guide is a sequence to help you support your voice when you’re working on camera or when you are using a microphone. Microphones only amplify what’s already there, so this sequence helps ensure you’re still supporting and directing your sound in a way that allows you to be heard. It’s great for actors and public speakers.

Let us know how it goes!

Take good care,

Christine & Lindsay

Find your Ground! Connecting to Vocal Authority

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Hey Friends,

If you have ever been told that you don’t sound authoritative enough, or that you aren’t grounded enough, then this sequence is for you. This week, we explore finding an authoritative sound that feels authentic to you and helps you connect on a deeper level to what you are saying. It’s good for public speakers who want to convey their message with credibility and for actors (or anyone!)  who feel like their emotions cause them to constrict and lose their ground.

On another note, this week is BeSpoke’s birthday! March 8th will be our 1st anniversary of having a live site. Help us celebrate– comment below and let us know what your favorite post has been in the last year! We would also love to hear from you if there is something you would like us to cover.

So let’s all say together (authoritatively!)… Happy birthday BeSpoke!!!!!

Take good care,

Christine & Lindsay

The Value of Process

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“You’ll never change your life until you change something you do daily. The secret of your success is found in your daily routine.” — John C. Maxwell

Lindsay wrote an (in my humble opinion) important post a couple of months ago about the significance of creating your consistency in your voice/communication practice. In this post she made a crucial point: voice and communication training can’t only happen in the classroom or with a coach if you really want life-long change. Skills and techniques have to be practiced consistently on your own if you really want to instill permanent shifts.

Why? Because when you are working on your voice, you are facing strong habits that are deeply instilled in your body’s muscle memory. For the voice to truly change, it requires a process of consciously changing those habits. We are the first to admit: changing habits is hard. As Rob Gilbert says: “First we form habits, then they form us.”

In my experience, changing habits doesn’t happen with a quick fix. It’s a process. At first, this process can feel daunting, but if you stick to it, the process itself is the reward, and you may make new discoveries you were never intending to make along the way.

This post is for everyone who is afraid of or feels overwhelmed by the “process.” It’s especially for my students who ask me after only a short time of working together (or even in our first session), “How can I change my voice without having to think about it?” My answer is— you can’t. But you can reap tremendous rewards by becoming conscious about your voice use (or becoming conscious, in general!). To illustrate the benefits of process, I would like to share with you a snippet of my own story.

My whole life, I’ve wanted to be an actress (except for my very early years, when I wanted to be a teacher— see how things come full circle?). I was very impatient about it. I got my BA in theatre at an institution in the States that had very little voice or movement training. I moved to New York immediately after graduating, and wanted success now now now. I felt tremendous social and financial pressure to be a successful working actress, to prove to everyone that I was good enough to be in this profession. But because of my lack of vocal and movement training, I didn’t have the chops. I had some good instincts, but I didn’t have enough of a relationship with my body, and my voice was tight and couldn’t carry in large spaces. A little voice in my heart kept saying that if I really wanted this, I was going to have to go back to school. This was extremely distressing, as it disrupted my plan of having success NOW. It felt like too much of a hurdle to jump— to disrupt the life I was building in New York to go back to school. So instead, I started making small changes, in manageable bites. Here was the progression:

I had always hated working out. I have never been very flexible and had bad memories of breathing problems when I was in school physical education classes, so I used to avoid working out because it brought up memories of shame and inadequacy. However, because I didn’t work out or have any kind of movement training, I had no relationship with my body. This meant that in rehearsals, even if I had a strong mental connection to the characters I was playing, I struggled to embody them. A teacher I was working with at the time told me— if you are serious about acting, you have to cultivate a relationship with your body.

I started slowly— with a few stretches every morning, no more than about 5 minutes. I realized quickly that those 5 minutes were making a huge difference to the rest of my day. So I increased that time to a 20-minute pilates video every morning. Twenty minutes is a lot to add to your morning routine, but within a few weeks I couldn’t imagine my mornings without this time. It was the time I woke up, came into my body, and set the tone for the rest of my day. My interest in mind-body connection eventually led me to yoga, which, thanks to technology and youtube channels, I practice now almost daily. This consistent practice has completely revolutionized my life. I went from a person who had no connection to her body to, through mindful, consistent, incremental practice over several years, has a daily habit of connecting to herself physically. I successfully made this shift by choosing a kind of work out that I love, that makes me feel good. I truly enjoy my yoga practice, so I look for ways of fitting it into my day.

This connection with my body made me increasingly aware of my disconnection with my voice. I began taking voice classes on my own, and perhaps like some of you, I hoped that things would magically change in class. Luckily, I had good teachers who were insistent that I find a way of making this work my own— of practicing at home. Based on my previous experience with building a work out routine, I knew I needed to start small, then build. I also knew that I needed to find a kind of voice work that I enjoyed, so that it wouldn’t feel like a chore. For me, that’s Fitzmaurice Voicework(R). I started practicing 5/10 minutes a day, but because I enjoyed the work so much, that time continued to grow, and again, I looked actively for ways to make that practice a part of my daily routine. In fact, I became so enamored with the changes I was noticing, that, in the end, I did uproot my whole life to go back to school— but for something different than I originally intended. I moved to London to train to be a voice teacher.

What started as small, incremental changes to my daily routine led eventually to a whole life shift. This kind of growth could only happen because I stuck to and trusted my process. When I talk about it in hindsight, it all seems very rosy. But the process is always filled with struggle and pitfalls. Struggle and pitfalls are an important part of learning— and  I am learning that struggle is often the step before a big discovery— an important part of the process to move through, rather than to avoid, if I want to get to the next step.

So that is my story. To sum it up, if you want to change something in a big way, start small. Think about something you can add to your daily routine, and then stick to it and watch what grows. It may take you in a totally different direction than you ever intended. What a delightful surprise that could be!

Please let us know what steps you are taking in your daily routine, and what your struggles and triumphs are. We would love to start a dialogue with you. Let’s make process cool again!

Christine & Lindsay